Ginnifer Goodwin

News, Reviews & Features
  • Zootropolis

    Movie Review | Ali Gray | 1st April 2016

    How many movies make up a renaissance? Without getting too hung up on terminology, I'm interested how we categorise, rank and file nascent movies - the age of this, the era of that etc. When does a hot streak cool into something of more substance? I only ask because Zootropolis is the latest in an increasingly long line of movies from Walt Disney Animation Studios that can rightfully call itself a classic. If you start with 2010's Tangled (and discount the still rather delightful 2011 Winnie The Pooh kiddy pic), that streak also includes Wreck-It Ralph, Frozen and Big Hero 6, all movies with iconic characters, impressively progressive agendas, humour and heart. Shouldn't we be talking about this decade's body of Disney in more grandiose terms? Zootropolis represents the apex of Disney's sparkling Digital Age; a blissfully beautiful, adventurous and charismatic movie that's typical of the studio of late.

  • A Single Man

    Movie Review | Anna | 16th February 2010

    Did everyone in the 1960s walk around with perfectly bouffanted hair, expertly lined eyes, a martini glass poised in one hand and a cigarette hanging artfully from the other, chattering about the Cuban missile crisis? We, the modern audience, would like to think so and Tom Ford is only too happy to indulge us. Consequently, A Single Man has an unreal, dreamlike quality to it - this is life through a Vaseline smeared lens, the 1960s as seen in a vintage Vogue magazine.

  • He's Just Not That Into You

    Movie Review | Ali | 8th February 2009

    This shamefully sappy, overly-long romantic odyssey, based on a self-help book of the same name, promises to subvert rom-com clich� and burst wide open the so-called 'rules' of dating etiquette. The movie opens with the shocking revelation that boys who push you down in the playground really like you. The rest of the film, des...

  • Walk The Line

    Movie Review | Ali | 2nd March 2006

    There's a certain macabre quality to how quickly society latches onto dead rock stars and posthumously elevates them to the status of Gods. Johnny Cash is one such case: largely ignored by an apathetic general public and often snubbed by the industry he helped to shape, it was only once he passed in 2003 that his albums sales r...