John Hawkes

News, Reviews & Features
  • Review: Too Old To Die Young wallows in neon-soaked misery

    TV Review | Luke Whiston | 22nd October 2019

    "It's been 84 years..."
    I gaze out upon the tundra, the sun slipping over the horizon as a bitter wind blasts ice shards across the landscape. I'm reminded of the seasons which have preceded me in the days, weeks and months now consigned to the past, and of the brave men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice on this arduous journey, of which I am the sole remaining survivor. We lost our captain early, driven mad by the unerring stillness. Five crew perished recovering a password. The first mate ventured outside searching for spare HDMI cables some days ago, never to return. But I write this final entry with a note of triumph in my heart - final, because once my frost-bitten hands have rested my pen I too shall be taking a stroll into the darkness, but not before making one last entry: I did it. I finished watching Nicolas Winding Refn's Amazon Prime Original series Too Old to Die Young.

  • #LFFtovers: The Sessions

    Movie Review | Ali | 22nd October 2012

    No sooner than it had begun (okay, 12 days after it had begun), the London Film Festival closes for another year. Shit. Even though I managed to break my own record by seeing a whopping SEVEN films in competition, I've still managed to emerge into the cold light of day with loads of poorly-written notes for films I've not yet had time to review. Hence these 'LFFtovers': a rather delicious pun that hopefully distracts you from how sloppy I've been in adding my reviews. Shut up. Here's my take on The Sessions.

  • Martha Marcy May Marlene

    Movie Review | Ali | 4th February 2012

    Despite success on the festival circuit and early talk of Oscar buzz, Martha Marcy May Marlene has found itself released in the UK on the busiest weekend of the year so far – sharing screens with Young Adult, Carnage, Chronicle, Man On A Ledge, Journey 2: The Mysterious Island and, of all things, Jack & Jill – without so much as an Oscar nomination to its name. It'd be a tragedy if such a delicate movie was left shattered by the elbow-swinging of the annual awards season rush: Martha Marcy May Marlene might not have campaign funding or grandstanding performances, but it has heart and soul, two qualities which are slowly corrupted throughout for your viewing pleasure.